Media Services

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Men considering a vasectomy shouldn’t worry that the procedure will increase their risk of prostate cancer, researchers say.
 
In a review of past research, they did find a slight increase in the risk of prostate cancer among men who had vasectomies, but the study’s lead author said the finding might be due to other factors and should not be a concern.
 
“It shouldn’t stop you from gaining something that is otherwise very effective for family planning purposes,” said Dr. Bimal Bhindi, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.
 
A vasectomy is a minor surgical procedure for men that is a 100 percent effective form of birth control, but can be difficult to reverse. The procedure prevents sperm from entering the semen ejaculated during sex.
 
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, according to the American Cancer Society. About one in seven U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and about one in 39 will die of it.
 
Data in the late 1980s suggested a link between vasectomy and subsequent prostate cancer, Bhindi told Reuters Health.
 
There was some concern over the quality of that research, he said. More recent studies also produced mixed results.
 
“We thought it would be good to synthesize it all and do an meta-analysis to get a unified answer,” said Bhindi.
 
Read more at https://newsline.com/dont-avoid-vasectomy-for-fear-of-prostate-cancer-st...

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

NO less than 214 million   women worldwide that want to prevent pregnancy have  access to modern contraceptives, the UNFPA has stated.
 
Making the declaration in Abuja during the  commemoration of the 2017 World Population Day (WPD), the body remarked that the day should be reviewed to reflect essence of Family Planning.
 
In the views of Country Director, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Mrs Mairo Mandara,  who spoke at the event,  “Family Planning should be declared a National Emergency.
 
“It is not about stopping people from giving birth, but seeking to control the process. The WPD is meant to draw attention to population explosion in the coming years.
 
“In Nigeria, the WPD 2017 provides  opportunity to discuss ways of checking possible population explosion. Population growth is not about large populations but quality population.”
 
A UN report says Africa has the highest fertility rate but lowest use of modern contraceptives, even as 26 countries look set to double their population by 2050.
 
Also speaking,  Chairman National Population Commission,  Mr. Eze Duruiheoma noted:  “The issues raised on WPD should not be for one-off discussion but  sustained until desired results are achieved.
 
Read more at http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/07/declare-family-planning-national-emer...

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

The United Nations Children’s Fund in partnership with the European Union have presented health equipment and other materials worth 1.2 billion naira to the Adamawa State Government.
 
The Chief of Field Office, UNICEF Nigeria, Bauchi, Abdulai Kaikai says the measure is in line with the second phase of the E.U., UNICEF, Federal Government Maternal New-born and Child Health project.
 
He says the project also covers Bauchi and Kebbi States, and in Adamawa State, it is being implemented in 226 Primary Health Care facilities in 21 Local Government Areas.
 
In his response, Governor Jibrila Bindow lauded the support, which he says is timely as the state has just declared a state of emergency on health.
 
Read more at http://tvcnews.tv/2017/07/unicef-e-u-donate-n1-2-bn-health-equipment-to-...

Monday, July 17, 2017

Nigeria’s Minister of Health, Isaac Adewole, has decried the inadequate attention the government is paying to health and the overdependence on foreign donors to fund health initiatives in the country.
 
Mr. Adewole, who spoke at the Maiden Edition of Health Communication Conference organised by Association of Nigeria Health Journalists, ANHEJ in Abuja on Thursday, said despite the improvement in budgetary allocation to the sector this year, it was still a far cry from global standards.
 
“Nigeria is still far below the Abuja Declaration, a commitment by the African Union Heads of Governments to ensure that at least 15 per cent of National Budgets are allocated to the health sector.
 
“In 2017, the Health Budget (Nigeria’s) is only around 4 per cent of the National Budget.
 
“Though this represents a slight improvement from around 3.73 per cent in the 2016 budget, the numbers are worrisome. This would mean that only about N1, 500 (One Thousand and Five Hundred Naira only) is being spent on the health of every Nigerian per year,’’ Mr. Adewole said.
 
He said no Nigerian should be deprived health benefits as it was a fundamental human right that must be defended.
 
Mr. Adewole also noted that no donor programme last forever adding that Nigeria must start funding a major part of its health programs.
 
“When you look at HIV, about 70 per cent of the resources for HIV comes from outside. 99 per cent of the commodities were paid for by outsiders, so we must put our money.
 
Read more at http://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/top-news/237221-fg-spends-n1500-per-y...

Monday, July 17, 2017

NIGERIA has restated its commitment towards ensuring access of women to family planning services and commodities with a pledge to achieve a modern contraceptive rate of 27 per cent among all women by 2020.
 
Nigeria also committed to increasing its annual allocation for contraceptives from $3 million to $4 million while ensuring total disbursement of $56 million to the states through  participation in the Global Financing Facility and  international development assistance loans.
 
The commitments were made as over 60 leaders from around the world,  gathered at 2017 Family Planning Summit in London, to make bold commitments that will  expand access to family planning to millions of women and girls worldwide. Commitments were made to the tune of $2.5 billion by 2020, with  $1.5 billion committed by countries in Asia and Africa.
 
These commitments are expected to go a long way in reaching thousands of women and girls with critical reproductive health information.
 
In Nigeria, over 3.8 million married and sexually active adolescents (15-19) of whom 19 per cent have an unmet need for contraception, and  increasing focus on adolescents and enabling additional 584,000 adolescent girls to use modern contraception by 2020, is expected to achieve a 14 per cent reduction in  adolescent birth rate.
 
Disclosing these and other commitments   at  the just concluded London Family Planning Summit, Minister of Health, Professor Isaac Adewole,  said  collaboration with  partners and the private sector is being strengthened towards expanding the implementation of the task-shifting policy.
 
Adewole said patent medicine vendors and community volunteers would be included to improve access to family planning services in difficult-to-reach areas and among disadvantaged populations.
 
Read more at http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/07/family-planning-nigeria-allocates-4m-...

Monday, July 17, 2017

The wife of the Cross River State Governor, Dr Linda Ayade has said that unskilled labour claimed the lives of two women that died in a prophetess home during delivery in Ikom local government area of Cross River State, explaining that the traditional birth attendant that attended to the women was professionally incompetent.
 
She regretted the death of the deceased at the point of delivery, saying “It is very sad that despite our effort, warnings and awareness creation on dangers of prayer house and Traditional unskilled birth attendants taking delivery, women still put their lives at risk to patronise these places. Some women have been clearly brain-washed into believing they will die if they go to health centres.”

 

 
“I can imagine the pain those families are going through now, older siblings left without their mother to face life. This is completely unacceptable and must be fought by all stakeholders involved in the society. TBAs must restrict their roles to referrals of every pregnant woman in their community to health centres or hospitals where care is free.
 
They should never manage complicated cases like in the index situation. The Ikom incidence clearly goes against the Government policy on maternal health” She stated.
 
Dr Linda Ayade who was speaking at the flag-off of the First Round Maternal Newborn and Child Health Week in Odukpani LGA urged women to disregard prayer houses and churches during delivery but should instead make use of health facilities or hospital closer to them. She condemned in strong terms the death of the two mothers and warned,
 
“This devilish act must not repeat itself again, our traditional rulers should join hands with Government to ensure their subjects are well informed about the use of health centre for delivery against churches or prayer houses and by doing so Cross River State will witness decrease in maternal and infant mortality rate in the state.
 
Read more at http://dailypost.ng/2017/07/17/wife-cross-river-governor-linda-ayade-lam...

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Olabisi Loto, a professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Obafemi Awolowo University, (OAU) Ile-Ife, has asked the federal government to expand the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS).
 
Speaking while delivering the 305 inaugural lecture of the university, entitled: ‘Give Me Children…Let Me Live: Combating the Misery of Infertility and Preventing Maternal Mortality’, Loto said there is need to cover more of the populace and provide more “therapeutic interventions to reduce the crippling out of pocket expenditure by patients”.
 
He advised healthcare providers and other individuals connected with childbirth to be proactive always in taking necessary steps to prevent maternal mortality.
 
“The government and policymakers need to make sure that our hospitals do away with the mere consulting clinic status that they have come to be known for over the years,” he said.
 
“They should be transformed to real functioning hospitals by improving on the funding, infrastructural development and the human capital development in these hospitals. The government also needs to expand the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to cover more of the populace as well as provide more therapeutic interventions to reduce the crippling out of pocket expenditure by patients.”
 
He urged government to ensure that hospitals were well equipped with necessary facilities and quality professionals that are capable of handling the situation before, during and after the childbirth.
 
Loto also appealed to government and policymakers to transform hospitals.
 
He emphasised the need to ensure adequate funding for the health sector and improvement in the infrastructural development and the human capital development in the hospitals.
 
Read more at https://www.thecable.ng/oau-prof-asks-fg-expand-nhis

Sunday, July 16, 2017

In few months time, WHO will be celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Declaration of Alma-Ata on Primary Health Care. In one of its reports on Primary Health Care, WHO explained that though, the global health context has changed remarkably over seven decades, the values that lie at the core of the WHO constitution and those that informed the Alma-Ata Declaration have been tested and remain true.
 
Lamenting our collective failure to align with these values, WHO concludes that this has really impacted negatively on the progress made in health globally.
Some of the fundamentals of Primary Health Care as captured in the report include the helplessness of a mother suffering complications of labour without access to qualified support, a child missing out on essential vaccinations, an inner-city slum dweller living in squalor.
 
Others include the absence of protection for pedestrians alongside traffic-laden roads and highways and the impoverishment arising from direct payment for care because of lack of health insurance.
 
That particular report published in 2008, revisited the ambitious vision of primary health care as a set of values and principles for growing the development of health systems.
 
In order to achieve the objectives of this vision for Primary Health Care, four sets of reforms that reflect a convergence between the values of primary Health care, the aspirations of citizens and the common health performance challenges that cut across all contexts have been identified and defined.
 
They include universal coverage reforms that ensure that health systems contribute to health equity, social justice and the end of exclusion; service delivery reforms that re-organise health services around people’s needs and expectations; public policy reforms that secure healthier communities by integrating public health actions with primary care by pursuing healthy public policies and strengthening national and transnational public health interventions and finally, leadership reforms that replace disproportionate reliance on command and control on one hand and laissez-faire disengagement of the state on the other.
 
In Nigeria, the government has stressed that it is committed to quality and accessible public health services through provision of Primary Health Care (PHC) in rural areas as well as provision of preventive and curative services.
 
According to a research paper on Primary Health Care service in Nigeria by Abdul-Raheem I.S, Oladipupo A.R and Amodu M.O, PHC is provided by local government authority through health care centers and health posts and they are staffed by nurses, midwives, community health officers, health technicians, community health extension workers and by physicians (doctors) especially in the southern part of the country.
 
The services provided at these PHCs include prevention and treatment of communicable diseases, immunization, maternal and child health services, family planning, public health education, environmental health and the collection of statistical data on health and health-related events.
 
The Health Care delivery at the LGA is headed, politically by a supervisory councilor and technically and administratively by the Medical Officer of Health (MOH) of the Local Government.
 
The different components of the LGA PHC are manned by personnel of diverse specialty. The LGA is running her primary health care service delivery in compliance with the principles/framework of the National Health Policy.
 
The LGA is divided into various health district/wards so as to enhance maximum benefit of the principle of decentralization of the Health sector whereby people are involved in the PHC processes.
 
Read more at 

Saturday, July 15, 2017

The UN Resident Coordinator, Mr Edward Kalllon, has called for a renewed commitment to champion advocacy for persons living with HIV/AIDS in the country.
 
Kalllon made the call at the Memorial Service organised  by the UN system in Nigeria on Friday in Abuja to honor late Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin.
 
Osotimehin, who until his death was the Executive Director of UN Population Fund (UNFPA), died on June 4 in Harrison, New York, at the age of 68.
 
“Let us also use this occasion to draw attention to Osotimehin’s service to his beloved country, Nigeria.
 
“As Director-General of the National Agency for the Control of AIDS and later as the Minister of Health, he made sure that Nigerians were constantly sensitised.
 
“He made sure that Nigerians were constantly sensitised about the level of the prevalence in the country and increased access to anti-retro-viral drugs for persons living with HIV/AIDS.
 
“He also championed advocacy and action to prevent mother-to- child transmission among pregnant women.
 
“Let us renew this advocacy as HIV/AIDS is still a major challenge in Nigeria today,’’ the resident coordinator said.
 
Kalllon said that though the UN family would remember him for his legacies, “ we also celebrate the virtues, values, valour of our departed senior colleague.
 
“Let us celebrate Babatunde by committing ourselves to doing those things he dedicated his whole life for.’’
 
According to him, Babatunde never saw human suffering as a challenge rather he saw it as an opportunity to serve.
 
He said that the late icon was committed to ending maternal mortality in the country, the continent and the world.
 
“Babatunde saw himself in every young person across the world today, who is struggling to be heard.
 
Read more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/07/un-bids-osotimehin-farewell-calls-ren...

Friday, July 14, 2017

Wife of the  Senate President, Mrs Toyin Saraki has scored Nigeria low on newborn survival, saying the level of improvement in reducing deaths in newborn babies globally has not played out in Nigeria.
 
Mrs Saraki, in a keynote address at the 10th annual general meeting and scientific conference of the Nigerian Society of Neonatal Medicine (NISONM), stated that there has been little improvement in reducing deaths in newborns.
 
Mrs Saraki, president/Founder, Wellbeing Foundation Africa, represented by Mrs Amy Oyekunle, Executive Director, Global, Wellbeing Foundation Africa stated that records of 240,000 babies dying out of at least seven million babies  born yearly in Nigeria was totally unacceptable.
 
“We all know, there has been a level of improvement in the reduction of under-five child mortality on the global scene, over the past few decades. However, while this improvement has played out a bit in Nigeria, such cannot be said about newborn deaths.
 
“Records show that at least seven million babies are born in Nigeria each year. Unfortunately, 240,000 of these deaths die in their first month of life, including 94,000 that tragically die on the same day at birth. This is totally unacceptable,’’ she said.
 
While social and community-based determinants of health such as age of the mother, antenatal education, poverty, mother’s literacy and religious and traditional beliefs still affect newborn survival in Nigeria, Mrs Saraki said it was crucial that cost effective and innovative solutions geared towards newborn health be implemented.
 
She, however, assured that WBFA will continue to work with other stakeholders like NISONM to enshrine best practices that can improve newborn survival in Nigeria.
 
 
Considering the challenges plaguing our healthcare system in Nigeria, including the high rate of maternal and neonatal deaths,  Saraki urged that the role of midwives should also be considered in improving survival of newborns in Nigeria.
 
Read more at