Media Services

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Why would a mother not breastfeed her child? If our mothers had known, if they had had the opportunity of understanding the importance of appropriate infant and young child feeding and the effect on national economic development, perhaps many of us would have done better in our various fields.
 
But research shows that simple things like introducing babies to breast within 30 minutes of birth and breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months as well as continuing with appropriate complementary feeding would reduce infants mortality. Even today’s mothers who are more informed are making the situation worse.
 
The campaign about the nutritional status of children in the first six months of life makes no meaning to many of them. Some have infant joined the bandwagon of those in favour of  breastmilk substitutes even when they have no health challenges.
 
Women whose husbands ordinarily could not afford infant formula are made to go through a lot of financial stress. It is almost becoming a status thing among women. Also the healthcare givers who should know better are aiding improper feeding of these newborns.
 
Mrs. Vera Odibu is one of these Nigerian women who are yet to be convinced on the need to breastfeed their babies exclusively for six months. “I did not breastfed my two children exclusively and I don’t intend to do that in the future. Infact, it is not possible,”Vera declared.
 
A bank executive, she believes that breastfeeding is for full-time house wives. However, her children have been denied the benefits of human milk which experts say is better than any food. Science has proved that breastmilk is a complex living substance like blood with a long list of active germ-fighting and health-promoting ingredients.
 
While Vera is wallowing in ignorance, Gladys Ejifoma was denied the opportunity of adding to the country’s Exclusive Breastfeeding Rate (EBR) which 2013 National Nutritional Health Survey, NNHS, put at 17 percent compared to about 63 percent in Ghana.
 
Gladys was eager to change but the failure of nurses to prepare her for lactation during ante-natal visits denied her the opportunity.
 
“I tried all I could but my breast was not bringing milk. I was asked to do all manner of things including using native comb to massage my breasts. I took all kinds of food but all to no avail,” she stated.
 
Four months after, she noticed some change in her nipples.   Further examination showed that she has inverted nipples.
 
“I was able to correct it but it was late.   It was my first child. I had no experience.   I think nurses should be re-trained on some of these things. I delivered my baby in hospital under the supervision of health workers. Nobody told me about inverted nipples; all I was told was to clean my nipples. It is even the nurses that will encourage you to give milk.”
 
Simple massaging of the breast would have solved Gladys’s problems but she did not have that information.
 
Vera and Gladys are lucky to have their babies alive, but Mrs. Maymunar Ali was unfortunate. Her child died at four months, no thanks to diarrhoea. Maymunar had all going well for her until she resumed work after three months of maternity leave. Owing to the fact that the company where she worked had no crèche, Maymunar was forced to leave the child at home with a house maid.
 
She was confident that the baby had enough to eat and drink since she had one week before resumption introduced the baby to infant formula. But little did she know what fate had in stock for her. It was around 11am when her phone rang. The maid at the other end of the phone told her to  return home as fast as she could.
 
She ran back home only to find her baby almost dead. She rushed her to  hospital. The baby was dehydrated and was diagnosed with diarrhoea. The baby was treated and discharged. A month after, the diarrhoea  came back but this time more serious. Efforts to save the baby proved abortive.
 
Maymunar lost her child.
 
Read more at http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/07/can-lose-baby-dont-breastfeed-six-mon...

Saturday, July 22, 2017

ltungo and Biliri, two major towns in Gombe State recently experienced some of the types of incidents that maternal and newborn health activists decry in Nigeria.
 
The first was at Kaltungo General Hospital mid-June, and Madam Rose, who witnessed the pathetic incident put it this way: “All she needed to survive was a few pints of blood; the doctor wanted blood to save her life, but there was no blood available in the hospital’s blood bank. So she was left on the delivery couch just as helpless as the doctor who wanted to help but couldn’t.”
 
Her name was Linda; she was young, nine months pregnant and in labour. For her, one thing had led to another on the fateful day. The chain of events started with her being rushed to Kaltungo General Hospital. However, it was not because she had gone into labour, but because she had suffered a snake bite. She was successfully treated of snake bite, but she now went into labour, and she was delivered of a baby boy.
 
Unfortunately, she bled; then the bleeding didn’t stop, and it became rather profuse. At some point it became clear that she needed a blood transfusion because she had lost too much blood. The hospital has a blood bank, but it was not functional; there was no blood there. A few hours after giving birth, Linda breathed her last. The cause of death was cardiac arrest following excessive bleeding, medically known as postpartum haemorrhage (PPH).
 
“Although we can say it was God’s plan, I am assuring you that she would have survived if the hospital had blood to give her,” Madam Rose said. Confirming that Linda had died as a result of PPH, Yunana Baraya, chief nursing officer of the hospital, said the death could have been averted if blood had been available in the blood bank.
 
In Biliri General Hospital, another woman also put to bed, but lost a lot of blood in the process. She required an urgent blood transfusion, but there was also none available. Unlike Linda in Kaltungo, this was not a totally helpless case if her husband would give some of his own blood. According to one of the hospital attendants, who asked for anonymity, the man shocked the entire hospital by refusing to donate blood. He said his faith did not allow him to do so. According to our source, all efforts to make him understand and cooperate were futile. His wife died while the drama was unfolding.
 
According to experts, the two incidents are characteristic of jaundiced maternal care in Nigeria. There is an abysmally low supply of blood to address blood loss through PPH, road accidents and health conditions that require blood or blood products. PPH, which is not an uncommon feature in child birth worldwide, is however, the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in Nigeria. This is mostly because there is usually shortage of blood either because blood banks are not functional or because people would not donate blood, or the required group is not available.
 
Speaking during a media roundtable to commemorate the 2017 World Blood Donor Day mid-June in Abuja, Dr Oluwatoyin Smith, coordinator of the National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS), said blood availability in Nigeria per head is about the lowest in the world because many people refuse to donate.
 
Read more at http://leadership.ng/2017/07/22/lack-blood-gombe-hospitals-takes-toll-pr...

Saturday, July 22, 2017

The Executive Secretary of Oyo State Primary Healthcare Management Board, Dr. Lanre Abass has disclosed that shortage of social amenities was as a result of uncontrolled population explosion in the country.
 
Abass stated this while delivering a paper, titled “Family Planning, Child Spacing, Empowering People, Building Nations” at the 2017 edition of the annual media forum organised by Development Communications (DevComs) Network in collaboration with the state ministry of Health in Ibadan.
 
He maintained that inadequate social amenities, such as good roads, access to healthcare facilities, schools among others was due to the increasing population without adequate plans.
 
Abass, who was represented by Mrs. Adeola Awakan, Family Planning Coordinator in the state maintained that “if population is controlled, there are many things families and the nation in general will benefit”.
 
He said that population that was controlled will “empower government to plan effectively for the needs of the people through manageable population growth.
 
“If population is controlled, it ensures adequate provision of necessary social amenities like electricity, good water, good road network and housing."
 
Read more at http://dailypost.ng/2017/07/22/nigerias-infrastructural-deficit-result-u...

Friday, July 21, 2017

Why is Nigeria restrategising on family planning?
 
Family Planning is one of the strongest anti-poverty strategies and low-hanging fruit for reducing maternal mortality. The success of the introduction of family planning as part of basic health in the health sector is to ensure that a woman’s right as a human right is realised. We want to include Family Planning as part of basic healthcare.
 
This is to complement ante-natal services, and immunisation routine. Under this commitment, we will remove all barriers so as to improve access. We will remove regulatory barriers and scale up access to new contraceptive methods, such as sub-cutaneous Depo Medroxyprogesterone Acetate injections (Sayana Press).
 
To transform its last-mile distribution of health and family planning commodities as a country, we will use a push-model system, and collaborate with the private sector to optimally transport, store and track commodities using an electronic logistics management system. A new tracking and accountability system will report yearly and real-time, expenditures for family planning at national and state levels. There will be a distribution of $6million to states through loans to the success of introduction of family planning as part of basic health in the sector.
 
How do you want to get this project done?
 
The government will increase the number of health facilities providing family planning services in each of its states and Federal Capital Territory (FCT) to 20,000 and leverage its 10,000 functional primary health care facilities to raise awareness about family planning. In this vein, Nigeria will partner stakeholders and gatekeepers to reduce socio-cultural barriers for family planning services, by collaborating with ministries to ensure the provision of age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health information to youth through the Family Life Health Education Curriculum and youth-friendly services in health facilities and other outlets. To address financial barriers, the government will collaborate with states, donors and other stakeholders on a health insurance scheme to make household family planning expenditures reimbursable.
 
Why is this project receiving so much commitment?
 
With a population of over a 400 million, by 2050, Nigeria may soon emerge as the largest country in the West Africa region and the third largest in the world – that will be demographic disaster as a country. Nigeria has over 3.8 million married and sexually active adolescents – from 15 to 19 of whom 19 percent have an unmet need for contraception. If Nigeria was to increase its focus on adolescents, enabling an additional 584,000 adolescent girls to use modern contraception by 2020, then Nigeria would see a 14 percent reduction in its adolescent birth rate. That is why we are investing in our youths, adolescents, and women. We must invest in the girl child for demographic dividend. Reducing unplanned pregnancies, unsafe abortions and improved health and well-being is important to reap demographic dividends. Access to contraception and family planning programmes is one of the most cost-effective ways to break the cycle of poverty.
 
And you think it won’t be another white elephant project?
 
Most barriers have been identified. All these barriers will also be removed, and policies implemented with new vigour by partnering the private sector-Patient medicine/drug vendors to ensure commodities get to the targeted end users. Barriers to the success of family planning will be identified and brought down, just as the Berlin wall was brought down in those days. Serious focus is to break down the barriers hindering females, especially women and youths, from accessing commodities and services. This will bring us to speed with modern day use of contraceptives.
 
The ministry will be collaborating with its partners and the private sector to achieve a modern contraceptive rate of 27 percent among all women by 2020. We have realised that there is a huge disparity between optimal uses of modern contraceptives across the country. In the Northeast, the use of modern contraceptive use is about three percent and about 35 percent in the Southeast.
 
We are doing things in a different way to ensure Nigeria is not left behind in the attainment of FP2020. Nigeria’s commitment of four million dollars will go a long way in reaching thousands of women and girls with critical reproductive health information. This project is domicile in the office of the vice president.
 
Read more at http://thenationonlineng.net/nigeria-investing-family-planning/

Friday, July 21, 2017

Does girl-child education have any impact in the Nigerian society or any other society for that matter? Of course, girl- child education has been identified as the backbone of the advanced societies of the world.  It is a critical issue that should not be treated with laxity. Its impact in the society is numerous and includes; improving the individual, causing her to be productive and not a burden to the society; it improves the economy of the society through various means such as environmental sustainability; lowers illiteracy rate which also leads to lower poverty rate.
 
Girl- child education also decreases maternal mortality. This is because women with formal education tend to have better knowledge about health care practices. Cross-country studies show that an extra year of schooling for girls reduces fertility rates by five to 10 percent i.e. later marriage.
 
Among children not attending schools, there are twice as many girls as boys and among illiterate adults, there are twice as many women as men so if the girl-children are given education, it means the rate of illiteracy will be halved which can give room for more women to be able to contribute financially to their families thereby making their families more capable of also securing education for their children.
 
This will also empower and improve productivity in the society.  It would also increase women’s involvement in the political process as educated women can participate in politics and contribute to effective governance of the society. With education, women are able to understand issues relating to women and can intelligently provide solutions to such issues.
 
Similarly, educated women can raise their voices to be heard especially to demand for equality and fairness on issues that concern them and their families. Having a voice that could be heard leads to reduction in the rate of domestic and sexual violence. Girl child education produces women that easily embrace safe sex thereby reducing the level of sexually transmitted diseases and they also have knowledge of the preventive measures to take to avoid other diseases.
 
Read more at http://leadership.ng/2017/07/21/girl-child-education-important/

Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Enugu State Government has embarked on the training of health communicators on how to effectively deliver exclusive breastfeeding campaign messages to women during their annual August Meeting in the state.
 
The state Director of Public Health, Dr. Okechukwu Ossai, disclosed this to the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on Thursday in Enugu.
 
August Meeting, a community or faith-based meeting of married women, peculiar to the South East serves as a social integration, re-engineering and economic forum for women.
 
It is also a veritable platform for women to collectively contribute positively to the development of their various communities and the society at large, especially in the South-East.
 
Read more at https://www.pmnewsnigeria.com/2017/07/20/august-meeting-state-prepares-b...

Friday, July 21, 2017

Some years back, at the hospital, Abu obviously restless prayed a silent prayer pleading that his wife’s life be spared, just this once. Two promises he also made if she returns alive, were to allow her rest for as long as she heals and never to compel her into sex without her opinion of what follows after. “I knew it was my fault, though she complained but I didn’t know it takes that long to heal, I thought she just wanted to refuse,” Abu said.

 

Abu had also insisted on having Zahratu fulfil her conjugal duties, notwithstanding her state of health. Zahratu, his wife was between life and death as she went into a preterm labour just six months after conception.
 

The pregnancy wasn’t planned, coming exactly three months after she had a stillbirth through caesarean section. Abu said, “I didn’t even consider that, we did some calculations and thought she was on her safe. We were both shocked when she took in again. All through the period of her pregnancy, Abu’s wife was weak and tired.

 

Although there is no established fact as to why a pregnant woman has to experience Preterm labour, Experts have noted that Preterm labour is one of the possible risks of getting pregnant at short intervals. 
 

Thankfully, its three years now, Zahratu has equally rounded off her course at the University without many distractions from her marriage and the couple have remained grateful for taking up a family planning method that has well worked for them.Unlike Zahratu who was lucky, many pregnant women did not live to tell the next story.
 

While it is estimated that Nigeria looses 40,000 women every year to pregnancy related complications, a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Emmanuel Otolorin said some of the deaths are being linked to unsafe abortions Delivering a lecture at a media round table on family planning and implications, he said a report by International Family Planning Perspectives shows that “Nigerian women obtain approximately 610,000 abortions, a rate of 25 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44.”
 

Otolorin also noted that while physicians in established health facilities perform an estimated 40 per cent of abortions, 60 per cent of the abortions are performed by quacks. 

He said that while it is very clear that women of reproductive age do not want to have unwanted babies, the best way to avoid that is either abstinence or the use of family planning commodities.

 

He also said, one sure means to prevent childbirth complications is to space the periods of pregnancy using contraceptives- this is especially as the body needs some time to heal before going through another pregnancy.

“The more pregnancy you have, the higher the risks of postpartum haemorrhage, just imagine a balloon, when you keep blowing it up, it gets weak, so you are weakening the wall of the womb and it just burst one day,” he said.

Although, childbirth complications cannot be completely ruled out, many women like Zahratu are either not allowed to decide on what will work for them or are living in ignorance on how to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Some do not even attempt to space their children, which poses great danger to the wellness of their reproductive system.Otolorin further said that family planning could reduce maternal deaths by 44% and prevents another 44% of neo natal deaths equally.

Chairman, Association for Advancement of Family Planning in Nigeria (AAFP), Dr. Ejike Orji, speaking on the causes of maternal deaths, explained that most women couldn’t make it during child delivery because they have given birth severally and the uterus at that point may have been weaken.

 

Read more at http://leadership.ng/2017/07/21/maternal-mortality-family-planning-rescue/

Thursday, July 20, 2017

 

Oko-Oba Primary Health Centre (PHC) in Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area of Lagos, months ago, could be termed an abandoned building where reptiles and other animals lurk. It was home to goats, fowls and creepy animals, instead of humans.
 
Grasses had overtaken the isolated building meant to provide healthcare for about 550,000 residents of several communities in Epe area, including Ojaoko-Oba, Tagbati, Oluwogbe, Ajigbinwa, Aromi, Arakpagi, Oriba, Maire, Onikokan, Onijigba and Alaoufun.
 
Residents of these communities had lost faith in the facility few months after its inauguration when they discovered it was no longer meeting their needs. Their pregnant women were accessing healthcare either with traditional birth attendants around them or would have to be driven on a motor cycle on a two hour journey to Epe main town for healthcare. This, of course increased maternal and child mortality in the communities.
 
But after THISDAY visited and listened to stories of residents of the area, in addition to other PHCs visited (Baruwa PHC in Ipaja, Akinyele PHC in Abesan Estate, and Oke-Eletu PHC in Ikorodu) a report was done to bring the plight of the residents to limelight, prompting the state government to say it would work on the facilities in addition to other PHCs it said were currently being renovated and equipped at the time.
 
As a follow up, THISDAY visited three of the facilities few weeks ago to know if their conditions have improved, or whether the promise made by the government for their renovation and equipping were kept.
 
The recent visit to Oko-Oba PHC suggests the facility has undergone a facelift, while members of the communities are said to be patronising the centre. The communities do not have private clinics as a form of alternative.
 
Although THISDAY did not meet the nurse in charge of the PHC when it visited on a Thursday morning, feelers from members of the communities suggest health workers come between Mondays and Wednesdays weekly to attend to patients, while the nurse in charge is said to spend her Thursdays and Fridays at Bogije Local Government secretariat where she also work in the health centre there.
 
According to a resident, Kemi Osunkemi, the PHC has been active for some months now, adding that deliveries, immunisations and general treatment were being done in the facility by the nurse and other health workers who come three times weekly.
 
But what happens when people need healthcare between Thursdays and Sundays? She said: “One of the problems we have is the road. Cars do not enter these communities and transportation is expensive. If a bike wants to carry you from the road up to any community here, the minimum you will pay is N500. No health worker spend N1,000 everyday to come to work here seven times a week. If government do our roads, I know health workers will be coming everyday, because we notice now they are very eager to work, unlike before.
 
“But another thing is, we are even grateful that we see them at all in some days of the week, because if you had come here last year, you will know no single person uses that PHC. Now that it’s being used, even if its for three days, we believe it’s a good start,” she added.
 
Read more at https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2017/07/20/lagos-fulfills-promise-...

Oko-Oba Primary Health Centre (PHC) in Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area of Lagos, months ago, could be termed an abandoned building where reptiles and other animals lurk. It was home to goats, fowls and creepy animals, instead of humans.
Grasses had overtaken the isolated building meant to provide healthcare for about 550,000 residents of several communities in Epe area, including Ojaoko-Oba, Tagbati, Oluwogbe, Ajigbinwa, Aromi, Arakpagi, Oriba, Maire, Onikokan, Onijigba and Alaoufun.
Residents of these communities had lost faith in the facility few months after its inauguration when they discovered it was no longer meeting their needs. Their pregnant women were accessing healthcare either with traditional birth attendants around them or would have to be driven on a motor cycle on a two hour journey to Epe main town for healthcare. This, of course increased maternal and child mortality in the communities.
But after THISDAY visited and listened to stories of residents of the area, in addition to other PHCs visited (Baruwa PHC in Ipaja, Akinyele PHC in Abesan Estate, and Oke-Eletu PHC in Ikorodu) a report was done to bring the plight of the residents to limelight, prompting the state government to say it would work on the facilities in addition to other PHCs it said were currently being renovated and equipped at the time.
As a follow up, THISDAY visited three of the facilities few weeks ago to know if their conditions have improved, or whether the promise made by the government for their renovation and equipping were kept.
The recent visit to Oko-Oba PHC suggests the facility has undergone a facelift, while members of the communities are said to be patronising the centre. The communities do not have private clinics as a form of alternative.
Although THISDAY did not meet the nurse in charge of the PHC when it visited on a Thursday morning, feelers from members of the communities suggest health workers come between Mondays and Wednesdays weekly to attend to patients, while the nurse in charge is said to spend her Thursdays and Fridays at Bogije Local Government secretariat where she also work in the health centre there.
According to a resident, Kemi Osunkemi, the PHC has been active for some months now, adding that deliveries, immunisations and general treatment were being done in the facility by the nurse and other health workers who come three times weekly.
But what happens when people need healthcare between Thursdays and Sundays? She said: “One of the problems we have is the road. Cars do not enter these communities and transportation is expensive. If a bike wants to carry you from the road up to any community here, the minimum you will pay is N500. No health worker spend N1,000 everyday to come to work here seven times a week. If government do our roads, I know health workers will be coming everyday, because we notice now they are very eager to work, unlike before.
“But another thing is, we are even grateful that we see them at all in some days of the week, because if you had come here last year, you will know no single person uses that PHC. Now that it’s being used, even if its for three days, we believe it’s a good start,” she added.

Oko-Oba Primary Health Centre (PHC) in Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area of Lagos, months ago, could be termed an abandoned building where reptiles and other animals lurk. It was home to goats, fowls and creepy animals, instead of humans.
Grasses had overtaken the isolated building meant to provide healthcare for about 550,000 residents of several communities in Epe area, including Ojaoko-Oba, Tagbati, Oluwogbe, Ajigbinwa, Aromi, Arakpagi, Oriba, Maire, Onikokan, Onijigba and Alaoufun.
Residents of these communities had lost faith in the facility few months after its inauguration when they discovered it was no longer meeting their needs. Their pregnant women were accessing healthcare either with traditional birth attendants around them or would have to be driven on a motor cycle on a two hour journey to Epe main town for healthcare. This, of course increased maternal and child mortality in the communities.
But after THISDAY visited and listened to stories of residents of the area, in addition to other PHCs visited (Baruwa PHC in Ipaja, Akinyele PHC in Abesan Estate, and Oke-Eletu PHC in Ikorodu) a report was done to bring the plight of the residents to limelight, prompting the state government to say it would work on the facilities in addition to other PHCs it said were currently being renovated and equipped at the time.
As a follow up, THISDAY visited three of the facilities few weeks ago to know if their conditions have improved, or whether the promise made by the government for their renovation and equipping were kept.
The recent visit to Oko-Oba PHC suggests the facility has undergone a facelift, while members of the communities are said to be patronising the centre. The communities do not have private clinics as a form of alternative.
Although THISDAY did not meet the nurse in charge of the PHC when it visited on a Thursday morning, feelers from members of the communities suggest health workers come between Mondays and Wednesdays weekly to attend to patients, while the nurse in charge is said to spend her Thursdays and Fridays at Bogije Local Government secretariat where she also work in the health centre there.
According to a resident, Kemi Osunkemi, the PHC has been active for some months now, adding that deliveries, immunisations and general treatment were being done in the facility by the nurse and other health workers who come three times weekly.
But what happens when people need healthcare between Thursdays and Sundays? She said: “One of the problems we have is the road. Cars do not enter these communities and transportation is expensive. If a bike wants to carry you from the road up to any community here, the minimum you will pay is N500. No health worker spend N1,000 everyday to come to work here seven times a week. If government do our roads, I know health workers will be coming everyday, because we notice now they are very eager to work, unlike before.
“But another thing is, we are even grateful that we see them at all in some days of the week, because if you had come here last year, you will know no single person uses that PHC. Now that it’s being used, even if its for three days, we believe it’s a good start,” she added.

Oko-Oba Primary Health Centre (PHC) in Ibeju-Lekki Local Government Area of Lagos, months ago, could be termed an abandoned building where reptiles and other animals lurk. It was home to goats, fowls and creepy animals, instead of humans.
Grasses had overtaken the isolated building meant to provide healthcare for about 550,000 residents of several communities in Epe area, including Ojaoko-Oba, Tagbati, Oluwogbe, Ajigbinwa, Aromi, Arakpagi, Oriba, Maire, Onikokan, Onijigba and Alaoufun.
Residents of these communities had lost faith in the facility few months after its inauguration when they discovered it was no longer meeting their needs. Their pregnant women were accessing healthcare either with traditional birth attendants around them or would have to be driven on a motor cycle on a two hour journey to Epe main town for healthcare. This, of course increased maternal and child mortality in the communities.
But after THISDAY visited and listened to stories of residents of the area, in addition to other PHCs visited (Baruwa PHC in Ipaja, Akinyele PHC in Abesan Estate, and Oke-Eletu PHC in Ikorodu) a report was done to bring the plight of the residents to limelight, prompting the state government to say it would work on the facilities in addition to other PHCs it said were currently being renovated and equipped at the time.
As a follow up, THISDAY visited three of the facilities few weeks ago to know if their conditions have improved, or whether the promise made by the government for their renovation and equipping were kept.
The recent visit to Oko-Oba PHC suggests the facility has undergone a facelift, while members of the communities are said to be patronising the centre. The communities do not have private clinics as a form of alternative.
Although THISDAY did not meet the nurse in charge of the PHC when it visited on a Thursday morning, feelers from members of the communities suggest health workers come between Mondays and Wednesdays weekly to attend to patients, while the nurse in charge is said to spend her Thursdays and Fridays at Bogije Local Government secretariat where she also work in the health centre there.
According to a resident, Kemi Osunkemi, the PHC has been active for some months now, adding that deliveries, immunisations and general treatment were being done in the facility by the nurse and other health workers who come three times weekly.
But what happens when people need healthcare between Thursdays and Sundays? She said: “One of the problems we have is the road. Cars do not enter these communities and transportation is expensive. If a bike wants to carry you from the road up to any community here, the minimum you will pay is N500. No health worker spend N1,000 everyday to come to work here seven times a week. If government do our roads, I know health workers will be coming everyday, because we notice now they are very eager to work, unlike before.
“But another thing is, we are even grateful that we see them at all in some days of the week, because if you had come here last year, you will know no single person uses that PHC. Now that it’s being used, even if its for three days, we believe it’s a good start,” she added.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Men considering a vasectomy shouldn’t worry that the procedure will increase their risk of prostate cancer, researchers say.
 
In a review of past research, they did find a slight increase in the risk of prostate cancer among men who had vasectomies, but the study’s lead author said the finding might be due to other factors and should not be a concern.
 
“It shouldn’t stop you from gaining something that is otherwise very effective for family planning purposes,” said Dr. Bimal Bhindi, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.
 
A vasectomy is a minor surgical procedure for men that is a 100 percent effective form of birth control, but can be difficult to reverse. The procedure prevents sperm from entering the semen ejaculated during sex.
 
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, according to the American Cancer Society. About one in seven U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and about one in 39 will die of it.
 
Data in the late 1980s suggested a link between vasectomy and subsequent prostate cancer, Bhindi told Reuters Health.
 
There was some concern over the quality of that research, he said. More recent studies also produced mixed results.
 
“We thought it would be good to synthesize it all and do an meta-analysis to get a unified answer,” said Bhindi.
 
Read more at https://newsline.com/dont-avoid-vasectomy-for-fear-of-prostate-cancer-st...