Media Services

Friday, January 12, 2018

The Yusra Peace Care Foundation, an NGO, has called for the construction of delivery rooms in Durumi IDPs camp in FCT to reduce the risk of maternal and child mortality.
 
Dr Fahad Muhammed, who is in charge of the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) clinic, made the call in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja on Friday.
 
He said that providing such a room in the camp would help in promoting the wellbeing of women and children.
 
He added that the organisation had saddled itself with providing free health care services to Internally Displaced Persons, noting that it was collaborating with the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants.
 
He explained that the foundation also collaborate with rotary club to provide drugs and needed humanitarian assistance to displaced persons in the camp.
 
He noted that the health facility used was set up by the Nigerian Army officers Wives Association (NAOWA) to provide free medical services to the IDPs.
 
Read more at https://sundiatapost.com/2018/01/12/ngo-calls-for-establishment-of-deliv...

Friday, January 12, 2018

A new report presented by the Women Advocates Research and Documentation Centre (WARDC) and Centre for Reproductive Rights (CRR) have flayed widespread detention of women who cannot pay medical bills upon delivery.
 
The report also indicated that the Federal Government has not done much to reduce the high maternal mortality rate from 2008 to date.
 

 

Founding director of WARDC, Dr. Abiola Akiyode-Afolabi, who presented the report at a press briefing in Lagos yesterday, noted that a World Health Organisation (WHO) report had in 2015 identified Nigeria as having the world’s fourth-highest maternal mortality rate.
 
The report on assessing efforts of government on reduction of maternal mortality and promotion of women’s maternal health in Nigeria was supported by the MacArthur Foundation.
 
It focused on Lagos and Kaduna.
 
According to the WHO report, there were 814 deaths for every 100,000 live births, a figure that has hardly changed since 2008 when Nigeria reported 829 deaths for every 100,000 live births.
 
“This is approximately 58,000 maternal deaths annually, indicating that approximately 159 women die every day due to pregnancy related complications.
 
The report noted that although Nigeria’s population accounts for just over 2% of the world’s population, it is responsible for approximately 19% of the world’s maternal deaths, Akiyode-Afolabi said.
 
She said access to maternal health facilities is still very poor even as the cases of detention of women who recently or put to birth on account of not being able to pay medical bills remains high.
 
It would be recalled that in 2014, one Folake Oduyoye was allegedly detained after being successfully treated because her family was unable to pay the medical bill in full.
 
The case was filed by WARDC and is still at the Federal High Court Lagos.
 
She described the rampant cases of detention of new mothers as illegal, unconstitutional and a violation of their rights to dignity and freedom from arbitrary detention and non-discrimination.
 
The director said, “The detention of women who cannot pay their medical bills is widespread. For example, in a study, of 446 women who had given birth at Enugu State University Teaching Hospital in 2012, 98 reported been detained because they could not pay their bills.”
 
Read more at https://www.dailytrust.com.ng/detention-of-new-mums-over-medical-bills-r...

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Fatimah Isah, from Gwiwa LGA of Jigawa state bled to death following pregnancy complications.
 
Fatima was unable to access quality healthcare during pregnancy and delivery.
 
As a teenager, she suffered pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, no thanks to pro-longed labour.  Fatima developed the condition as a result of labour that lasted for two weeks.
 
She was sent to her parents’ home at seven months pregnancy. Caught in the web of tradition, Fatima could not attend antenatal care in the hospital, because her parents wanted her to deliver in the house.
 
Fatima was faced  with traditional constraint in seeking care and by the time the family consented, she had been in labour two weeks. Her husband later took her on motorcycle to a specialist hospital in the State that was two miles away.
 
She underwent a Ceasarian Section, but, despite efforts by the medical doctors at the hospital, she came down with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. She later bled to death, but her baby survived.
 
Fatima’s mother narrated: “Newly married women who are pregnant for the first time often stay with their mothers when they are in their seventh month. It is our tradition. This tradition is very important because the specialist hospital to this place is two miles away.
 
“Another thing is that there is no transport to go to the health centre or any other health facility.  You hardly see any doctor to attend to you at the nearby primary healthcare centre. I tried my best with other experienced women, even traditional birth attendants, but my daughter’s case was difficult. She suffered and bled to death before we could arrive at the hospital.”

Read more https://independent.ng/women-bleed-death-poor-access-healthcare/

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Professor Oluwarotimi Ireti Akinola, is a Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and current National President, Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria, SOGON.
 
During the Annual General Meeting of the Society in Sokoto,  Akinola spoke to Good Health Weekly about fortunes of SOGON while  stressing the need for repositioning of policies that would bring about better maternal and child health in Nigeria. Excerpts:
 
Plans for next three years as President of SOGON Basically one cannot run through all the plans that you have but I will just tell you what flagship programmes we have currently.
 
One of the flagship programmes is called volunteer obstetrician scheme which means that, we take in obstetrician down to address the human resource component of the chain to the baseline local governments so that each obstetrician adopts a Primary Healthcare Center where there are no obstetrician, normally you don’t have them at that level, so you can have medical officers, midwives, nurses, Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWS).
 
Major problems in health sector One of the major problems in the sector is the lack of political will to drive policies. For instance, Nigeria has not devoted  5 percent budget to health.
 
The Abuja declaration which was done in Nigeria for African nations actually specified 15 percent of the budget so there is paucity of fund but even with the available resources you still find out, for example policies are often not well orchestrated towards addressing the issue of maternal and new-born health.
 
As specialists,  we are custodians of women’s health. What do we want to do? We feel that we need to broaden our partnership particularly with the media in terms of advocacy, we can’t get to the people, the people do not know, so if we can increase awareness of health issues we are sure that maternal and child health will be a battle half won.
 
There is need for Nigerians to prevail on the President, Governors, Local government Chairmen, and other political authorities to implement those policies that will be favorable.
 
Talking about universal health coverage, we are talking about the health Act that has been signed. None of these things has been put into practice not even budgeted for in most states.
 
The National Health Act was signed in 2014 but it has not yet been implemented.  It is not budgeted for in the budget line. That is why I specify that you should do something with your budget but we are not looking at it.
 
The other aspect is the percent of consolidated revenue that is supposed to be put in health, if that is done you have finance for universal health coverage. I cannot see the prospect in the 2018 budget presented by the President, even when it is passed perhaps it might still be before appropriations and all that in the assemblies and senates but the figure is not better certainly.
 
Allocation to health is even lower, I think it is about 4.9 percent or something, we have done 5 before.
 
 
Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2018/01/lack-political-will-setback-nigerias...

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

When Helen discovered  she was pregnant, she was excited to welcome a new life, but her hopes took a crashing turn when she had a miscarriage weeks later.
 
After all the tests, she continued to bleed, and was admitted to the ICU for post partum sepsis along with an infection in her uterus.
 
“I was really sick and needed to have three  D&Cs done and it took a while for me to overcome the shock of sepsis. I was one of the lucky ones who made it but I’m still losing  weight,” she told Good Health Weekly.
 
Helen’s case is typical of several hundreds of thousands. Although the  annual maternal mortality rate  from maternal  infections in Nigeria has dropped over the years, maternal and postpartum sepsis remains quite significant.
 
In March 2013, the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria reported that 17 percent of the 11,600 maternal deaths were recorded in Nigeria were attributable  to infection during pregnancy.
 
Top 3 killers: As one of the top three leading causes of maternal and neonatal deaths in Nigeria, maternal sepsis is an illness that can develop in some pregnant women as well as women who have recently put to bed.

 
Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2018/01/silent-rage-maternal-sepsis-puts-wom...

Sunday, January 7, 2018

A non governmental organisation in Katsina says maternal mortality seems to be on the rise across the state.

 
The Katsina State Maternal Accountability Forum said shortage of manpower in primary and secondary health facilities is one of the root causes.

 
The forum says there is a gap between the state government and development partners working on the health sector in the state.
 
Read more at https://tvcnews.tv/2018/01/maternal-mortality-on-the-rise-in-katsina-rep...

A non governmental organisation in Katsina says maternal mortality seems to be on the rise across the state.

 
The Katsina State Maternal Accountability Forum said shortage of manpower in primary and secondary health facilities is one of the root causes.
The forum says there is a gap between the state government and development partners working on the health sector in the state.

A non governmental organisation in Katsina says maternal mortality seems to be on the rise across the state.

 
The Katsina State Maternal Accountability Forum said shortage of manpower in primary and secondary health facilities is one of the root causes.
The forum says there is a gap between the state government and development partners working on the health sector in the state.

A non governmental organisation in Katsina says maternal mortality seems to be on the rise across the state.

 
The Katsina State Maternal Accountability Forum said shortage of manpower in primary and secondary health facilities is one of the root causes.
The forum says there is a gap between the state government and development partners working on the health sector in the state.

A non governmental organisation in Katsina says maternal mortality seems to be on the rise across the state.

 
The Katsina State Maternal Accountability Forum said shortage of manpower in primary and secondary health facilities is one of the root causes.
The forum says there is a gap between the state government and development partners working on the health sector in the state.

Saturday, January 6, 2018

A family planning costed implementation plan for 2016 to 2018 to provide direction for a sustainable family planning programme with detailed activities, strategies, goals and indicators to address all components towards achieving the state’s vision on family and reproductive health has been launched by the Ogun State Primary Health Care Development Board.
 
The three-year plan is aimed at increasing the contraceptive prevalence rate among families in the state from 26% to 52% by 2018.
 
Speaking at the launch of the programme at a ceremony held at Hilltop Tavern, Abeokuta, the state Commissioner for Health , Dr Babatunde Ipaye, said  the document was developed under the guidance and oversight of the board with support from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), affirming that the plan would ensure the sustainable and successful implementation of the state’s family planning programme and policies in the coming year.
 
Ipaye, represented by the Permanent Secretary in the ministry, Dr. Nofiu Aigoro, noted that the state had adapted and implemented many national policies and strategic plans, including the National Population Policy for Development, National Reproductive Health Policy and Strategic Plans, among others.
 
Read more at http://thenationonlineng.net/govt-launches-three-year-plan-family-health/

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Contrary to emerging evidence which has proved that HIV-positive women who breastfeed maximise their babies’ health prospects, Nigerian mothers living with the infection are still evading the exercise.
 
Until recently, the World Health Organisation (WHO) advised HIV-positive mothers to avoid breastfeeding if they were able to afford, prepare and store formula milk safely.
 
But, research has since emerged that shows that a combination of exclusive breastfeeding and the use of antiretroviral treatment can significantly reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to babies through breastfeeding.
 
A visit to the Heart to Heart Centre (H2H) of the Badagry General Hospital, Lagos State by The Journalists’ Alliance for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Nigeria (JAPiN) shows why mothers living with HIV are denying their babies breastfeeding.
 
At H2H, some mothers that were at the centre for post-natal care spoke to INDEPENDENT said that they were not breastfeeding their babies because of fear infecting them with HIV.

Read more https://independent.ng/hiv-fear-force-mothers-to-shun-breastfeeding/

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

During the 60th  National Conference onHealth, NCH, Project Director, Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI), Dr Mojisola Odeku, speaks about the essence of The Challenge Initiative, TCI. Excerpts.
 
The Challenge Initiative, TCI, is doing business in an unusual way. It’s really nothing new but a practical way of ensuring that the owners of the land take it back for themselves with us just providing the light technical assistance.
 
In reality, what this means is that the State and Local Government Areas are taking ownership in scaling up a home grown model that has worked for Nigeria in increasing modern use of contraceptives for family planning in our bid to reduce maternal mortality.
 
Evidence has shown that if we embrace and scale up family planning, we would reduce deaths of mothers by 30 percent and promote child survival by 25 percent.
 
So really, it is a quick win if we really must ensure that maternal and child survival which we have all signed to as a community of practice in the State and National levels but actually put in action rather than lip service.
 
We have found it is cost effective rather than tackling emergencies and other secondary issues that emanate from lack of spacing your family, or limiting it when you are satisfied with the number that you want.
 
This initiative called TCI is led by the government, which means for the first time, government will show expression of interest that they are interested in scaling up this model that we have rolled out in some other parts of the country.
 
Evidence has shown that TCI is working and so, they want to use it, integrate it into their existing plans and make that action a reality in the community especially among the poor who really need it and are the voiceless, who really do not have funds when it comes to out-of pocket expenses.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2018/01/nigeria-enhances-maternal-child-surv...

Monday, January 1, 2018

Nigeria started 2017 with the news of outbreak of Meningitis which lasted for months and was followed by other rare and uncommon diseases. There were also new policies and the launch of primary health care centres to improve the health sector. During the year, doctors and health workers also embarked on strikes, while many global health reports were released.
 
PREMIUM TIMES compiles some of the major health events that headlined 2017.
 
1,166 people died of meningitis in six months
 
Between December 2016 and June 23, 2017, a total of 1,166 people died as a result of meningitis outbreak in the country.
 
Children between five to 14 years were most affected accounting for 6,791 cases out of a total 14,513 cases reported in 24 states. Zamfara was the most affected state in terms of casualties, followed by Sokoto and Katsina. Together, they accounted for about 89 per cent of the cases.
 
The year’s meningitis outbreak was a rare strain, meningitis C. It started from Zamfara State and was not reported early to the ministry of health. The lack of necessary vaccine to contain the disease led to it spreading to 24 states in the country.
 
The outbreak, which reached an epidemic and alert threshold was declared over six months after the first case.
 
Monkeypox: Nigeria records one death, confirms 61
 
Monkeypox, another rare disease, also resurfaced and was confirmed in the country.
 
Fourteen weeks after the first suspected monkeypox case in the country, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control, NCDC, reported the first death from the disease.
 
From September through December 9, 172 suspected and 61 confirmed cases were reported in different parts of the country. Laboratory confirmed cases were reported from 14 states which are Akwa Ibom, Abia, Bayelsa, Benue, Cross River, Delta, Edo, Ekiti, Enugu, Lagos, Imo, Nasarawa, Rivers and FCT.
 
The majority of cases were males and aged 21 to 40 years old.
 
Meanwhile, NCDC has also deactivated the Monkeypox Emergency Operations Centre, EOC.
 
Other disease outbreak in Nigeria
 
There were confirmed outbreaks of cholera reported from seven states: Borno, Kebbi, Zamfara, Kano, Lagos, Oyo, Kwara and Kaduna states.
 
Aside Kwara and Borno where the outbreak ran for an extended period, other states were being sustained at low levels.
 
A total 1,558 suspected cases of cholera were reported including 11 deaths from five local government areas. About 50 per cent of suspected cases were males and 49 per cent, female.
 
Read more at https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/headlines/254127-2017-sad-year-in-ni...