Media Services

Saturday, June 17, 2017

The Children’s Parliament in Zamfara has called on the state government to domesticate the Child Rights Act in order to address the issues of poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy and abuse of children.

 
The call was made by the Clerk of the parliament, Nana Tsafe on Saturday in Gusau at a joint news conference held by the parliament and the state’s School Children Advocacy Club.
Newsmen report that the news conference was part of activities to mark this year’s Day of the African Child.
This year’s theme is: “The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development for Children in Africa’’.
Read more: http://www.nigeriatoday.ng/2017/06/childrens-parliament-urges-domesticat...

Friday, June 16, 2017

Hauwa Mohammed cuddled her six months old baby, Muhammed Umaru, while waiting to be attended to at a health centre where she has gone to seek help.
The baby looks too small for his age, skinny, pale and with swollen cheeks and feet. These are symptoms of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM).
Hauwa is one of many women accessing medical help for their children at the Community Management for Acute Malnutrition (CMAN) in the Out Patients Therapeutic Centre (OTP) in Nasarawo Health Clinic, Yola North, Adamawa State.
The 25-year-old mother is a first time mum with little or no experience in child care or upbringing. She seems not to know much about the importance of Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF) hence, her rush to introduce the baby to pap early.
Read more: http://allafrica.com/stories/201706160625.html

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Nigeria currently has a high incidence of maternal mortality. According to the United Nations ‎Population Fund, Nigeria is responsible for 10 percent of the global maternal mortality burden. That is, about 111 women die during child birth in the country.
The IDRC is funding the programme through the West Africa Health Organisation (WAHO), which is making a contribution of $1.5m.
The main objective of the programme is to “improve the demand for, the production of, and the use of‎ research findings in decision-making in maternal, neonatal and child health programmes and policies within the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)”.#
Read more:https://www.thecable.ng/canada-pledges-1-9m-child-health-programme-niger...

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Abuja, June 15 (IANS/MAP) The Nigerian has called on states and healthcare agencies to redouble their efforts on reducing maternal and infant mortality in the country.
National Primary Health Care Development Agency's Executive Director Faisal Shuaib said on Thursday that whatever primary healthcare agencies were doing in their states was not working.

 
He said that Nigeria's poor health outcomes in critical areas had shown in high death rate of pregnant women and also of children under the age of five.
"We are expected to deliver on results and we will be held accountable for our performance and most important evidence of our performance will be seen in the reduction in deaths of pregnant women and children."
Shuaib tasked all state heads of Primary Health Care Agencies to open up on their challenges with a view to provide practical solutions to them.
Read more: http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/nigeria-calls-for-ste...

Thursday, June 15, 2017

The life of a child is a simple one: be a child and enjoy as much of life as you can, while you can.
 
For a typical child in Africa, you have the bonus struggle of beating incredible odds to stay alive.
 
The first battle children have to fight is against their environment, and it depends on whether they end up in the overcrowded slums of Kroo Bay, Sierra Leone or the lush heart of Stockholm, Sweden.
 
For 700 million children around the world currently, there is no bright chance at a proper childhood.
 
While compiling data for 172 countries across the world, Save the Children's first annual End of Childhood Index makes for some sad reading about the plights of children, most especially in Africa.
 
Rated on health, education and protection status, the international NGO ranked the surveyed countries based on the population of endangered children they have, from fewest to most.
 
 
Africa occupies the bottom 20 positions on that ranking with Niger at the base.
 
Read more at http://www.pulse.ng/gist/childhood-africa-is-the-worst-place-for-childre...

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

The International Development Research Centre (IDRC), a Canadian government agency , says it is contributing 2.6m Canadian dollars ($1.9m) to the funding of a maternal and child health programme in Nigeria and in five other West African countries – Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Benin and Burkina Faso.
 
Nigeria currently has a high incidence of maternal mortality. According to the United Nations ‎Population Fund, Nigeria is responsible for 10 percent of the global maternal mortality burden. That is, about 111 women die during child birth in the country.
 
The IDRC is funding the programme through the West Africa Health Organisation (WAHO), which is making a contribution of $1.5m.
 
The main objective of the programme is to “improve the demand for, the production of, and the use of‎ research findings in decision-making in maternal, neonatal and child health programmes and policies within the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)”.
 
Sue Godt, a representative of the IDRC, launched the initiative tagged, ‘Maternal Evidence Programme (MEP)’ at the ongoing meeting of West Africa health ministers in Abuja on Thursday‎.

 

Read more at https://www.thecable.ng/canada-pledges-1-9m-child-health-programme-niger...

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Maternal mortality has been determined unequally at different times and different regions. However, a consensus has now been reached. In practice, the definition adopted by the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is now almost universally applied. Read more about the causes of maternal mortality in Nigeria!
 
Maternal mortality refers to the rate of women who lose their life during pregnancy or while giving birth. These days, the indicator and level of maternal mortality in any country is significant. The quality and level of organization of modern obstetrical institution's work are used to determine this rate.
 
Causes of maternal mortality
 
Maternal mortality is inexcusably high in the country. Every day, about 800 women die because of complications which are connected with pregnancy or childbirth.
 
According to the estimates, about 303.000 women died during and after pregnancy and childbirth in 2015. Almost all of these deaths happen in low-income region.
 
Besides, most of them can be prevented.
 
Huge maternal mortality reflects injustice in access to medical and sanitary services in some countries. It emphasizes the enormous gap between the wealthy and the poor people.
 
Almost all accidents of maternal death appear in evolving countries. More than half of these cases happen in sub-Saharan Africa. Almost one-third in South Asia.
 
More than half of maternal deaths occur in places with unstable conditions and humanitarian problems. The highest danger of maternal death threatens teenage girls under the age of 15.
 
Difficulties during pregnancy and childbirth are the main reasons of death among adolescent girls in most developing countries.
 
Read more: https://www.naij.com/1108144-10-maternal-mortality-nigeria.html

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

A meeting of health ministers from ECOWAS member countries has kicked off in Abuja.
 
The meeting, which is held annually, is organised by the West African Health Organisation (WAHO).
 
Speaking with journalists at the ECOWAS secretariat on Tuesday, Kofi Busai, director of primary health at WAHO, said this year’s meeting is looking at ways to reducing maternal mortality in the region.
 
Nigeria currently has an alarming incidence of maternal mortality. According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNPFA), Nigeria is responsible for 10 percent of the global burden of maternal mortality. It is estimated that 111 Nigerian women die during childbirth daily.
 
Read more at https://www.thecable.ng/health-ministers-west-africa-meet-address-matern...

Thursday, June 1, 2017

The United Nation Children’s Fund [UNICEF], on Thursday solicited the support of the Emir of Kano, Alhaji Muhammadu Sanusi II in addressing issues related to child protection, survival and development in Nigeria.
 
Mr Mohamed Malick-Fall, the newly appointed UNICEF Country Representative, made the appeal when he paid a courtesy visit on the Emir at his Palace in Kano.
 
“We believe that as someone who has the influence, you can help us to address a number of issues that children are confronted with which are related to child protection, survival and development."
 
“So I am here to assure you of my readiness to work with you to continue expanding what you have been doing in favour of children not only in Northern Nigeria but the country at large,” the UNICEF chief said.
 
Malick-Fall said he was also at the palace to commend the monarch for his strong commitment, vision and leadership when it comes to issues related to children.
 
He reaffirmed the commitment of UNICEF to work with various states and the Federal Government in mobilising all segments of the society to work in favour of children.
 
“Nigeria is a very important country and there are a number of issues affecting it and it carries large burden when it comes to issue of out of school, malnutrition and child mortality, among others,” he said.
 
Read more at http://www.pulse.ng/local/emir-sanusi-unicef-seeks-monarchs-support-to-a...

Thursday, June 8, 2017

A Non-Governmental Organization, The Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI), has raised the alarm over the increasing number of fake health workers going to markets and public places in Oyo State to administer family planning injections on unsuspecting women.
 
Oyo State Team Leader of NURHI, Mrs. Stella Akinso who disclosed at the weekend urged the security agents to arrest the quacks because of the havoc they commit to the health of these women and its implication to family planning and child spacing. She disclosed that most of the complications associated with the family planning were caused by the quacks. She, however, advised women to always go to designated Primary Health Care (PHC) centers and government approved hospitals for family planning.
 
Mrs Akinso who spoke at a Media Round Table on ‘Safe Motherhood’ organized by Development Communications (DevComs), Network in conjunction with NURHI said, “We were shocked to note that they have even gone beyond administering injections on them or giving them pills but to the extent of inserting Intrauterine Device Copper (IUD), and in the process many uterus have been perforated”.
 
She said, “When there are quacks, there will be more complications, the government have to do something about it because a quack will recommend anything to patients”.
 
While appealing to the Oyo State Government to employ more health workers, she said the quacks had been latched on inadequate number of health in most of the public health facilities to cheat on women She also bemoaned some PHC for charging fees on family planning which Federal Government said must be free and urged women to report any health worker in PHC that demanded money from them for the purpose of family planning to the security.
 
While advocating stiffer penalties for the quacks in the health sector, she noted with satisfaction that the “gospel of family planning is spreading like a wild fire with economic recession being experienced in Nigeria.
 
The former Chairman of Nigeria Medical Association (NMA), in Oyo State, Dr. Muideen Olatunji called on government to increase funding and invest more on health sector to reduce the rate of maternal death in Nigeria.“We have quality personnel that can raise the standard of living in this country to the point where you don’t need to rush to abroad for anything.
 
Read more at https://guardian.ng/features/health/nurhi-raises-alarm-over-fake-family-...